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The Rubbish Whisperer: Saving New Zealand From Plastic Pollution With Produce Bags And My Favourite Reusable Cup

The Rubbish Whisperer: Saving New Zealand From Plastic Pollution With Produce Bags And My Favourite Reusable Cup

Last Christmas, my grandmother gifted me a few produce bags. I thought it was an awesome gift, better than socks, but I already had enough produce bags. So, as a budding minimalist, I made a mental note to re-gift them to someone else… NEVER HAPPENED. After trying one, I wanted more. They instantly became my favourites.

Meet The Rubbish Whisperer: creators of these coveted produce bags, and wizards behind reducing single use plastic throughout New Zealand. It’s an honour, neigh, an absolute privilege to be part of their team and tell you more… they certainly don’t stop at produce bags!

 What my fridge looks like after a Sunday market haul

What my fridge looks like after a Sunday market haul

The Rubbish Whisperer products are designed to reduce single-use plastics. They focus on the main culprits: straws, cups, makeup pads, bin liners, toothbrushes, cotton buds, food wrap, and cleaning brushes.

To date, they’ve saved over 21 million plastic bags and 1.5 million plastic straws from existence.

Now that deserves bold letters and underlining.

Their produce bags, makeup wipes, and water balloons are made right here in New Zealand. The Rubbish Whisperer provide 14 local jobs in Christchurch, and all their staff are paid at least a living wage ($20.20NZ/hour). Not to mention the fact they work in a fun-filled office run by their inspiring CEO, Helen. I’m this close to packing my bags and heading to Christchurch to start a new career making zero-waste water balloons!

Speaking of water balloons

When the balloons first arrived at my house, I had great fun sitting them on my kitchen bench, and asking every visitor that stopped by, what they were. No one got it right, but everyone got excited when they found out.

Plastic-free Water Balloon Benefits:

  • No queuing at the tap or struggling to tie the balloons shut - just pick your colour, dunk in a bucket and throw!

  • Each balloon can be thrown 3-4 times before it needs re-charging.

  • The fun lasts longer as the balloons can be used over and over.

  • No little bits of balloon to pick up at the end of the day!

  • Simply cold machine wash, line dry, and use them another day.

The Rubbish Whisperer sell products as school fundraisers in NZ and Australia, and have raised over $45,000 for schools and community groups in the last year alone. What a great way to run a school fundraiser! They also work with corporate companies, hospitality, wholesale, and retail (to the likes of you and me). As one small business in Christchurch, their impact is spreading far and wide, making me hopeful for the future.

 Ice cream: Plastic free style

Ice cream: Plastic free style

I carry The Rubbish Whisperer with me wherever I go; in the form of a Stojo. This cup collapses into itself, meaning it can fit in my small handbag, or coat pocket. I cannot tell you how many times strangers have commented on it, or air hostesses have applauded me as I whip it out and ask for a glass of wine, minus the disposable cup.

The Rubbish Whisperer have nailed it: they’re focusing their energy where it counts, and doing so in a non-threatening, fun, and productive way.

Shop The Rubbish Whisperer here.

P.S. The veggie bags are the best because they are so light (meaning you don’t get charged for the extra weight), and you can colour coordinate your produce with the colour of the bags.

 Paper Straws (with green turtle print)

Paper Straws (with green turtle print)

As a rule, I only work with brands I love, use, and can whole heartedly back. This is a sponsored blog (I can't pay my electricity bill with free products), but 100% my own words, photos, and opinion.

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